A Handbook for Teaching and Learning in Higher Education: - download pdf or read online

By Heather Fry, Steve Ketteridge, Stephanie Marshall, Steven Ketteridge

ISBN-10: 0749438770

ISBN-13: 9780749438777

Guide for these constructing their services and realizing of training in greater schooling. offers a origin within the suitable pedagogic rules and learn. up to date and revised to mirror the fast adjustments in larger schooling; comparable to larger use of know-how in instructing and widening scholar variety. earlier ed: c1999. Hardcover, softcover on hand from the writer.

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Extra info for A Handbook for Teaching and Learning in Higher Education: Enhancing Academic Practice

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Teachers should avoid content overload; too much material will encourage a surface approach. Basic principles and concepts provide the basis for further learning. Assessment has a powerful impact on student behaviour. OVERVIEW What is important about teaching is what it helps the learner to do, know or understand. There are different models of learning that teachers need to be aware of. What we do as teachers must take into account what we know about how students learn. REFERENCES Barnett, R (1994) The Limits of Competence, Society for Research into Higher Education/ Open University Press, Buckingham Barnett, R (1997) Higher Education: A Critical Business, Society for Research into Higher Education/Open University Press, Buckingham Becher, T (1989) Academic Tribes and Territories, Society for Research in Higher Education/Open University Press, Buckingham 24 l Development of practice Biggs, J (1987) Student Approaches to Learning and Studying, Australian Council for Educational Research, Hawthorn, Victoria Biggs, J (1993) From theory to practice: a cognitive systems approach, Higher Education Research and Development (Australia), 12 (1), pp 73–85 Biggs, J (1999) Teaching for Quality Learning at University, Society for Research into Higher Education/Open University Press, Buckingham Biggs, J and Collis, K F (1982) Evaluating the Quality of Learning: The SOLO taxonomy, Academic Press, London Biggs, J and Moore, P (1993) The Process of Learning, Prentice-Hall, New York Boud, D and Walker, D (1998) Promoting reflection in professional courses; the challenge of context, Studies in Higher Education, 23 (2) Bright, B (ed) (1989) Theory and Practice in the Study of Adult Education: The epistemological debate, Routledge, London Brookfield, S (1989) The epistemology of adult education in the United States and Great Britain: a cross-cultural analysis, in Theory and Practice in the Study of Adult Education: The epistemological debate, ed B Bright, pp 141–73, Routledge, London Bruner, J S (1960) The Process of Education, Harvard University Press, Cambridge, Mass.

They are meant to communicate course/module expectations to the student, so they should be stated in language that the student would understand (see Case Study 1). Case Study 1: Writing learning outcomes Oxford Brookes University Well-written learning outcomes will need to satisfy a number of key criteria and should: • • • • • be written in the future tense; identify important learning requirements; be achievable and assessable; use language which students can understand; relate to explicit statements of achievement.

At a more detailed level, the questions or items used within an assessment component need to be created according to some form of blueprint. 1, where a test item is to be generated for each cell in the table. Effective assessment procedures need to be at once valid (or appropriate) and reliable (or accurate and consistent). Validity can be seen as having three aspects: face validity, construct validity and impact validity. Face validity is to do with the appropriateness of the content of a test for the audience and level used.

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A Handbook for Teaching and Learning in Higher Education: Enhancing Academic Practice by Heather Fry, Steve Ketteridge, Stephanie Marshall, Steven Ketteridge


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